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Did You Know?

It is estimated that 10-20% of Canadian youth are affected by a mental illness or disorder - the single most disabling group of disorders worldwide.

20% of Canadians will personally experience a mental illness in their lifetime.

1 to 3% of Canadians have a developmental disability.

Of 80,000 individuals with a developmental disability in Ontario, 24,000 have a dual diagnosis.

It is estimated that 77% of adults with a developmental disability also live in poverty.

Lesbian, gay and bisexual youth are 14 times more likely to attempt suicide than heterosexual youth.

Lesbian, gay and bisexual youth experience substance abuse problems 3 to 5 times higher than heterosexual youth.

Mental illness indirectly affects all Canadians at some time through a family member, friend or colleague.

Mental illness affects people of all ages, educational and income levels, and cultures.

It is estimated that 10-20% of Canadian youth are affected by a mental illness or disorder - the single most disabling group of disorders worldwide.

Approximately 8% of adults will experience major depression at some time in their lives.

Anxiety disorders affect 5% of the household population, causing mild to severe impairment.

Suicide accounts for 24% of all deaths among 15-24 year olds and 16% among 25-44 year olds.

Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in both men and women from adolescence to middle age.

The mortality rate due to suicide among men is four times the rate among women.

Almost one half (49%) of those who feel they have suffered from depression or anxiety have never gone to see a doctor about this problem.

Mental illnesses can be treated effectively.

Everybody Counts

Q'S AND AS

Q: What is Griffin Centre?

A: Griffin Centre is an accredited, non-profit mental health centre offering a variety of services to youth, adults, and their families in Toronto.

Q: Where are you located?

Griffin Centre’s head office is located at 24 Silverview Drive in the Yonge and Finch area. We also have program sites located in East and West Toronto.

Q: What are your office hours?

We are open Monday to Thursday, 8:30 am to 8:00 pm and Fridays from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.

Q: How do I access your services?

Call our Intake Worker at (416) 222-1153. Intake can answer questions about our programs and direct you to the right person.

Q: Who can access your services?

Yes, there is a waiting list for our services, but the length of the list changes all the time, and is different depending on the service and program. Please contact our Intake Worker for more details.

Q: Do you have a waiting period for new clients? How long is it?

Griffin Centre has many different programs and services that are flexible and responsive to the changing needs of our clients. Counselling services are available to youth, adults and their families. We offer day treatment programs, and residential support services for youth and adults with a dual diagnosis (mild developmental delay coupled with mental health needs). The Griffin Community Support Network is also available to adults with a dual diagnosis.

Q: What type of programs and services do you offer?

A developmental disability refers to the fact that a person’s intellectual and social functioning is significantly lower than what it should be for their age. On an IQ scale people fall within various categories which includes average, low average, borderline, mildly delayed, moderately delayed, and severely delayed. The only way to certain if someone has a developmental disability and specifically a mild developmental disability is to have a psychologist do an assessment. Assessments can be arranged through your family doctor, guidance counsellor, or teacher.

When a person has a developmental disability they are not able to “catch up” to others their own age. However, individuals with a mild developmental disability have the potential to live full and independent or semi-independent lives, however, they require a great deal of assistance to learn independent skills.

Q: What is a Mild Developmental Disability?

A developmental disability refers to the fact that a person’s intellectual and social functioning is significantly lower than what it should be for their age. On an IQ scale people fall within various categories which includes average, low average, borderline, mildly delayed, moderately delayed, and severely delayed. The only way to certain if someone has a developmental disability and specifically a mild developmental disability is to have a psychologist do an assessment. Assessments can be arranged through your family doctor, guidance counsellor, or teacher.

When a person has a developmental disability they are not able to “catch up” to others their own age. However, individuals with a mild developmental disability have the potential to live full and independent or semi-independent lives, however, they require a great deal of assistance to learn independent skills.

Q: What is a Dual Diagnosis?

Within the community of service providers the term dual diagnosis refers to individuals with a developmental disability and mental health needs.

People who have a developmentally disability have significant cognitive and adaptive limitations which typically appear during childhood or adolescence. Stated a different way, these individuals are functioning intellectually well below age expectations. They also have difficulty in at least 2 areas of adaptive functioning behaviour which focus on how well they can meet personal and social demands. Areas of adaptive function include: communication, self-care and self-direction, home living, social and interpersonal skills, use of community resources, academic skills, work, leisure, health, and safety. The diagnosis of developmental disability is typically made by a psychologist through the use tests, interviews, observations, and informal assessment techniques. The degree to which a developmental disability is present is represented through category descriptors that include: mild, moderate, severe and profound.

The types of emotional/mental health problems we come across are numerous. For example, mood disorders (e.g., depression, bipolar), problems with substance use, anxiety disorders (e.g phobias, post traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder) attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct and oppositional disorders, pervasive developmental disorders etc.

Q: Do you charge for your services?

There are no fees for our services for clients in Toronto with exception of participation of youth and adults in respite services provided by the Centre. There are fee for service programs available to youth, adults and their families who live outside our service area.